What is PropTech?

Introducing PropTech

PropTech (Property Technology) is the name given to technological innovations that are developed for and implemented within the property industry.

At the same time, PropTech refers to the industry, or movement, that the innovation comes out of;  The PropTech Industry.

In any discussion about PropTech, one must focus on both the outcome, PropTech, and the cause, the Digital Transformation of the built environment. One will not exist without the other.

The PropTech Industry has been driving huge change and deep discussion over the last few years, bringing together an audience of like minded people to better advance the best practices of the property industry.

But PropTech is just one aspect of the Digital Transformation, the global adoption of technology, a force with a far larger agenda than simply property.

The Digital Transformation is affecting every industry on the planet; as such, it affects the vast majority of individuals too. The role that the PropTech community is playing, and must continue to do so, is to represent the property industry’s interests during this period of Digital Transformation

To do so, it must succeed in educating the wider property industry as to the importance of facing their digital future, whilst simultaneously protecting the industry and its customers from any potential harmful disruption coming from the world of tech, only allowing the best and most genuinely helpful innovations to enter the market.

In the context of a fire, PropTech is the accelerant needed to spark the flames, but the Digital Transformation is the embers that keep it burning through the night.

Asked to define PropTech at a recent conference I came up with a small statement which, after much consideration with a fellow panelist Professor Andrew Baum, author of the PropTech 3.0 report, we decided on the following:

Defining PropTech

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PropTech is one small part of the wider digital transformation of the property industry. It describes a movement driving a mentality change with the real estate industry and its consumers regarding technology-driven innovation in the data assembly, transaction, and design of buildings. – Baum & Dearsley, 2017.

Because the term ‘PropTech’ is so wide reaching; a movement, a gathering, and a noun, it’s important to analyse this definition closely to offer a truly comprehensive answer to; what is PropTech?

PropTech is one part of Digital Transformation

PropTech is not the only industry contributing to the digital modernisation of the property industry. Rather, it is just one small part of the Digital Transformation which is literally and simply defined as “the change associated with the application of digital technology[1]”.

As such, if property professionals want to remain knowledgeable about the current and future state of the industry and the innovations that are going to disrupt the traditional way of doing things, they must take in a much broader picture than just PropTech.

Professionals must, for example, be aware of innovation and progress happening in robotics, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, autonomous vehicles, and the Internet of Things (IoT). All of these industries, plus many more, will, without question, have an affect on the property industry.

It is only by understanding both these more futuristic notions of the property market and those, more immediate aspects of technological change; mobile website optimisation and CRM systems being two examples, that you can truly understand Digital Transformation.

The Digital Transformation is a process of change, one which is neither simple nor quick. It’s a process that often occurs over a  5-10 year period and drives change in many core pillars of an organisation’s structure.

The three most common targets for change are mentality, culture, and operating systems. Arguably, it is the mentality of industry professionals that is most in need of immediate disruption; at the same time, it is also the most difficult change to implement.

PropTech is a Mentality Change

Vitally important to understanding what PropTech is, is to see it not only as a technological movement, but as an entire mentality change.

The advancement of the property industry, in this age of the digital revolution, requires not only industry professionals but also the general public to change the way they think about property’s best practices.

Consumers are now used to digitised businesses. On the whole, they are comfortable with online processes and procedures, often shunning traditional, more stunted systems in favour of fluent and efficient technological ones.

As proof of this, one only needs to glance at the world of payment services. The rise of, and acceptance of, chip and pin, and contactless, has been incredibly fast. Consumers want ease and fluidity, but they also want trust. Whilst, for the finance and banking industries, this move must have required a huge mentality change, they did a good job of acting quickly and ensuring that consumer trust for new methods was won quickly and smoothly.

Whilst the act of buying or letting properties is far more complex than, for example, tapping a card to buy coffee,  the process of reaching the final act is slow and laborious. The property industry needs to make make the process as seamless and secure as possible. This is what the modern consumer demands.

Property is often considered an industry stuck in time. Best practices have long been the same; why change it now? has often been the attitude.  However, not only does this attitude cause problems for new startups in the sector, constantly butting heads with archaic mentalities, but it also results in inefficiencies running throughout the sector.

Another issues that this leaves the property industry with is, how does one attract the best technological talent to a sector that is seen as so old fashioned? Where systems are built on old platforms and Excel spreadsheets still dominate?

PropTech is about Innovation; both Endogenous and Exogenous

As stated by Professor Baum in PropTech 3.0[2], PropTech is is both endogenous and exogenous.

  • Endogenous

Endogenous technology is that which comes from within the property industry. For the most part, the technology that we have seen in property so far has been endogenous.

Such technology tends to focus on the streamlining of the property industry’s workflow and best practices. Common examples are property listings (Zoopla, Rightmove), online estate agents (Purplebricks and eMoov), and various software packages that are there to increase efficiencies in already existing processes.

For the next few years, most of property’s innovation will be endogenous. They will be created mainly by property people to help property people.

  • Exogenous

Exogenous technology is that which comes from outside of, but still takes effect on, the property industry and possibly offers the most risk to the industry.

Examples include Virtual Reality, which will completely change the way that properties are marketed and designed, and Artificial Intelligence, which will disrupt the way we understand and interpret our data and how the built environment works from day to day – which parts of the building are wasting energy, which rooms are going unused, and how best to increase potential returns on investments.

Data is said to be the new oil but if you consider the amount of data coming out of our buildings as the mass of sensors takes over. A system will be required to monitor all data, interpret the results and then instigate necessary changes. AI has the possibility to do all this and will be built be people not necessarily positioned in the property sector but whom will hold tremendous power over the sector.

Applications of Exogenous technology are so vast that they warrant an article, or rather articles, of their own.

It is expected that exogenous technology will really start to disrupt the property industry in the longer term, but that won’t make their arrival any less disruptive. In fact, exogenous technology very much sits in the boat of Amara’s law; we overestimate change in the short term but underestimate its impact in the longer term.

PropTech is about buildings and cities

With a combined asset value of $217 trillion[3] the property market and the potential for innovation within it is huge.

It is often considered on a much smaller level i.e. consideration of a single PropTech company impacting a single small aspect of the property process. This is particularly the case on more endogenous technologies.

Looking at a single home or building in isolation is by no means wrong, but the combined impact of all singular assets together is something more exciting; greater than the sum of its parts.

Most of the smaller projects in PropTech are often viewed on a private interest level, singular buildings or developments, for example.  But it’s when we move on from thinking about buildings and start thinking about city-wide transformation that things get really interesting. However,  the globe is currently battling a huge urbanisation challenge.

The proportion of the global population living in cities as opposed to the countryside exceeded the 50% threshold in 2008 and, by the 2030s, it is estimated five of the World’s eight to nine billion people will live in cities, many of them in slums[4]. This means there is a governmental agenda to deal with PropTech on a city level.

This is important for many reasons, but fundamentally it suggests that funding will be made available and that the attitude of looking at technology as a means to aid city development is going to be pivotal. It is at the top of government agenda and therefore PropTech needs to be taking advantage of that and delivering the innovations that will drive the required change.

In conclusion; PropTech is people.

The end goal of PropTech is to best prepare the property industry for the digital future and then maintain its prosperity thereafter.

But, because the property industry is very much a people-first industry, PropTech must do more than simply innovate and disrupt. It must understand its role in the broader picture, it must educate and mediate, it must listen to the needs of professionals and consumers, it must not disrupt for the sake of disruption. It must aid private businesses to run more efficiently, with greater returns, whilst simultaneously working to address and solve current societal issues such as sustainability and affordable housing.

PropTech will, once technology is fully accepted and implemented, become known simply as ‘property’. The two will no longer need different titles because technology will be the norm rather than the new.

To reach that point, and this might be the most important fact of all, PropTech must show to the world that it is not a rival to the property industry, but rather a set of tools designed to help the industry, and those who work within in, perform to the highest possible standard.

PropTech is not the replacement of humans with machines; it is the utilisation of modern technology to enhance the abilities, speed, and efficiency of those who sell, buy, maintain, manage, work within, live within and make their living from property.

And because so much of our world and quality of life revolves around the built environment, PropTech has a responsibility to wield its considerable power thoughtfully and compassionately, for PropTech not only carries the responsibility of strengthening the property industry, but it is also a vital component for making the the world a better, safer, and more prosperous place for all.

[1] “Digital transformation – Wikipedia.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_transformation. Accessed 14 Nov. 2017.

[2] PropTech 3.0: The future of Real Estate,  Professor Andrew Baum & The University of Oxford https://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Press_Office/Images/proptechreport/PropTech%203%20-%20The%20Future%20of%20Real%20Estate.pdf 

[3] “Savills World Research: How Much Is The World Worth?.” 24 Apr. 2017, http://www.mcguire.com/blog/2017/04/savills-world-worth/. Accessed 15 Nov. 2017.

[4] “World Urbanization Prospects – the United Nations.” https://esa.un.org/unpd/wup/publications/files/wup2014-highlights.pdf. Accessed 15 Nov. 2017.

This article is written by James Dearsley, Founder, PropTech Consult. He is a keynote speaker at PropTech Middle East 2018, being held on 29-30 October 2018, at Sofitel Dubai The Palm Resort & Spa, UAE.

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QGBC’S Vision For Creating A Smart And Healthy City

Qatar is currently witnessing unprecedented urban development, from the establishment of Lusail City and the development of downtown Doha, to the inception of numerous infrastructure projects, the need to incorporate smart technologies in city planning in an effort to move towards establishing a healthy city is becoming vital.

Retrofitting Doha to become a truly smart city requires the development of a comprehensive long-term strategy with active participation from all the relevant stakeholders in the public and private sectors. In Doha’s context, a smart city will fully support healthy living in all aspects including water and energy conservation, healthy air quality, increased community interaction and active lifestyle. The use of state-of-the-art technologies, such as smart water management system, intelligent and automated air, noise and waste management systems, and real-time communication mechanisms, will eventually help Doha move closer to realizing its vision of a smart and healthy city.

In an effort to conceptualize the development of a smart and healthy city amidst the ongoing infrastructural development, experts at Qatar Green Building Council (QGBC), last year devised a comprehensive guide ‘Doha: A Rough Guide to Healthy Cities’.  The Guide, http://qatargbc.org/interest-groups/green-infrastructure, tackles the issue of the environmental health of urban areas which is becoming increasingly important to the world’s population as a majority of people are shifting towards inner cities.

Highlighting the benefits of planning and designing a healthy city, the non-technical infographic provides design and planning professionals, senior school students and advocates of sustainable development, with interesting guidelines on how to create a healthy city.

The key for QGBC and relevant stakeholders is to foster education around this subject to help create behavioural change in the process. This infographic is a starting point for such practices, which need to be further highlighted through national dialogues, the likes of Arab Future Cities Summit, the Qatar Green Building Conference, and the Qatar Sustainability Week.  Such efforts will foster the development of green infrastructure as a national resource capable of delivering a wide range of environmental, economic and social benefits.

by Meshal Al Shamari, Director – QGBC

4 Ground-breaking Use Cases of Smart Data using HPC

High Performance Computing has primarily been applied within scientific research, the financial world and relatively recently also to forecast the weather. The financial services industry was the first commercial industry to adopt HPC. Nowadays you will find the most advanced HPC systems trading stocks in nano-seconds and generating massive amounts of money for their owners.

Banks have used HPC for pricing exotic financial instruments, optimizing their portfolios of mortgage-backed securities and managing firm-wide global credit and debit risks.  But there are more use cases for HPC in combination with Smart Data:

Fraud Detection

Fraud detection is an extremely important area for the financial industry. Millions of dollars could be saved if suspicious transactions are stopped before they occur. To do this, millions of transactions across the globe should be analysed in real time. The problem is that algorithms will need to find unknown patterns within that data, which could indicate a fraudulent transaction.

It requires not only analysing millions of transaction, but also many other data sources that offer the right context for a certain transaction. For example, is a certain credit card transaction valid or not. That not only depends on the transaction itself, but also for example on the location or the moment of the transaction.

One company that deals with these volumes is PayPal. On a daily basis, they deal with 10+ million logins, 13 million transactions and 300 variables that are calculated per event to find a potential fraudulent transaction. Thanks to High Performance Data Analytics, PayPal saved in their first year of production over $700 million in fraudulent transactions that they would not have detected previously.

Personalized Medicines and Drug Discovery

Already I mentioned the possibilities of personalized medicines and how it requires HPC. Although personalized medicines might still be quite far away, the pharmaceutical industry is already using High Performance Computing for drug design and discovery.

Drug design and discovery is a tedious process. It can easily require several years or longer before a drug hits the market. This is due to rigorous testing in labs on animals and later humans before it is made available to the masses.

High Performance Computing in combination with Big Data enables the pharmaceutical industry to find, for example, the right proteins for a certain drug among millions of compounds. This can be done thanks to simulation analysis and testing a plethora of varieties on thousands of different virtual patients. Thus, drug discovery can be reduced with multiple years, eventually saving a lot of lives.

Smart Energy Grids

Smart energy grids might still be long away; already multiple energy companies are experimenting with the possibilities of a smart energy grid. The potential of a truly smart energy grid is tremendous; reduced energy consumption, better and safer electrical grids and a safer and cleaner environment. Thanks to HPC, smart energy grids are becoming a reality.

A smart energy grid deals with massive amounts of data from a wide variety of sources, all located in a highly disperse network. Imagine if every household would have a truly smart energy meter and at every single moment in time, it is measured how much energy they use, from which devices, for how long and at what price. Multiplied by millions of households, we are easily talking exabytes of data that need to be analysed in real-time to determine whether someone is allowed or not to charge his/her electrical car. That can only be done using a HPC infrastructure and a High-Performance Data Analytics environment.

Manufacturing Simulation Analysis

From the beginning, HPC has been involved in the modelling and simulation of complex physical and quasi-physical systems. Modelling and simulation analysis enables an organization to gain a better understanding of a certain project, without the need to actual test the product in real-life. Thanks to this approach for example, Tesla was able to have the early edition of the Tesla Roadster pass dozens of tests, without the need for dozens of cars that could be crashed (as is traditionally done in the automotive industry).

What Tesla did during developing the Tesla Roadster has become common practice for Tesla. But also in other industry, simulation analysis can save companies a lot of money when developing new products. Thousands of iterations can quickly be tested taking into account hundreds of different variables. Based on the outcome of each simulation, the eventual product is improved. High Performance Computing is required to perform these millions of simulations, at least if you want to get it done relatively quickly.

Other Industries

Of course, these four industries are just the beginning of what is possible. Basically, any organization that wants to make serious business from Big Data could use HPC and HPDA.

Other industries that are already using High Performance Computing are among other the Space industry, Engineering (Oil and Gas) industry, Defence, Publishing industry, governments (think the NSA) and of course academia. In the years to come, this list will probably become a lot longer.

Author: Mark van Rijmenam

Mark van Rijmenam is Founder of Datafloq. He is a highly sought-after international public speaker, a Big Data strategist and author of the best-selling book Think Bigger – Developing a Successful Big Data Strategy for Your Business. He is named a global top 10 Big Data influencer. Currently, he also pursues a PhD at University of Technology, Sydney on how organizations should deal with Big Data, Blockchain and (Human) AI.

Prediction in Big Time Series Data

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Mohammad Shokoohi-Yekta, Data Scientist, Apple

Time Series data is the new big data and it’s almost everywhere. Time Series is an ordered set of real values, quantities that represent or trace the values taken by a variable over a period of time. Some examples are stock prices, sensor data collected from smart watches/phones, weather data, heartbeats, etc.

Prediction and forecasting have been a topic of great interest in the data mining community for the last decade. Most of the work in the literature has dealt with discrete objects, such as keystrokes (i.e. predictive text), database queries [1], medical interventions [2], web clicks, etc. However, prediction may also have great utility in real-valued time series. For concreteness we briefly consider two examples:

  • Researchers in robotic interaction have long noted the importance of short-term prediction of human initiated forces to allow a robot to plan its interaction with a human. For example a recent paper notes the critical “importance of the prediction of motion velocity and the anticipation of future perceived forces [to allow the] robot to anticipate the partner’s intentions and adapt its motion” [3].
  • Doppler radar technology introduced in the last two decades has increased the mean lead time for tornado warnings from 5.3 to 9.5 minutes, saving countless lives [4]. But progress seems to have stalled, with 26% of tornados within the US occurring with no warning. McGovern et al. argue that further improvements will come not from new sensors, but from yet-to-be-invented algorithms that “examine existing (time series) data for predictive rules” [5].

While forecasting is mature enough to have its own conferences and commercial software (SAS, IBM Cognos, etc.), the handful of research efforts to consider time series rule-based prediction have met with limited success. In [6] we show novel algorithms that allow us to quickly discover high quality rules in very large time series datasets that accurately predict the occurrence of future events.

[1] Li, G., Ji, S., Li, C., and Feng, J. Efficient type-ahead search on relational data: a TASTIER approach. SIGMOD Conference 2009: 695-706.

[2] Weiss, S., Indurkhya, N., and Apte, C., Predictive Rule Discovery from Electronic Health Records. ACM IHI, 2010.

[3]   Gribovskaya, E., Kheddar, A., and Billard, A. Motion Learning and Adaptive Impedance for Robot Control during Physical Interaction with Humans. ICRA 2011.

[4]   Brotzge, J. and Erickson, S., Tornadoes without NWS warning. Weather Forecasting, 25, 159-172. 2010.

[5] McGovern, et al. Identifying Predictive Multi-Dimensional Time Series Motifs: An application to severe weather prediction. Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery. 2010.

[6] Shokoohi-Yekta, M., Chen, Y., Campana, B., Hu, B., Zakaria, J., & Keogh, E. (2015, August). Discovery of Meaningful Rules in Time Series. In: Proceedings of the 21th ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, Sydney, Australia, 1085-1094.

 

2nd Annual Arab Future Cities Summit 2015 triggered discussions on integrated smart city solutions

Eng. Abdulla Rafia, Assistant Director General - Engineering & Planning Sector, Head of The Sustainability Committee, Dubai Municipality and Mr. Majed Al Suwaidi, Managing Director, Dubai Internet City and Dubai Outsource City inaugurated the 2nd Annual Arab Future Cities Summit 2015

Eng. Abdulla Rafia, Assistant Director General – Engineering & Planning Sector, Head of The Sustainability Committee, Dubai Municipality and Mr. Majed Al Suwaidi, Managing Director, Dubai Internet City and Dubai Outsource City inaugurated the 2nd Annual Arab Future Cities Summit 2015

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, November 4, 2015: Various solutions and initiatives pivotal for smart city development were the key talking points at the recently concluded 2nd Annual Arab Future Cities Summit 2015. Held under the patronage of Dubai Municipality and organized by global conference producers, Expotrade, the summit witnessed participation from over 350 attendees from across the GCC.

Eng. Abdulla Rafia, Assistant Director General – Engineering & Planning Sector, Head of The Sustainability Committee, Dubai Municipality and Guest of Honour, Mr. Majed Al Suwaidi, Managing Director, Dubai Internet City and Dubai Outsource City inaugurated the summit. The ribbon-cutting ceremony was followed by an opening speech by both these esteemed dignitaries. Premium sponsors Samsung and DarkMatter also took the stage to deliver a welcome address.

Majed Al Suwaidi, Managing Director of Dubai Internet City and Dubai Outsource City, said, “Dubai is already an established international hub for business, ICT, media and so on, with dynamic industries and a vibrant economy, and smart initiatives will further enhance the Emirate’s position as a leader in the field of technology and also in the field of innovation. This conference provided an excellent platform to showcase just how far Dubai has come as a Smart City, and also for businesses and individuals to discuss areas of future collaboration and ways to work towards our leadership’s ambitious goal; to be the smartest city in the world.”

All the invited speakers during their sessions covered different facets in the smart cities domain that ranged from cloud computing to cyber security; from ICT innovation to robotics; from energy efficiency to hydrology. Mohammed Gharaibeh, Head of Enterprise Business Group, Samsung Electronics Business presented on the company’s innovative end-to-end solutions that can be integrated not only in a citizen’s day-to-day life but also can be adopted by cities at large to enhance efficiency, increase productivity and security.

Dr. Mario Rossi, Landscape Architecture Manager, The Office of H.H Crown Prince of Dubai during his session emphasized on the use smart technologies for a better and sustainable landscape in Dubai. He supported his presentation with an extremely interesting case study on the implementation of robots for maintenance activities with the display of three robots on stage, which piqued the curiosity of all the attendees present.

The impressive lineup of speakers included Manchester City Council’s Stephen Turner; William Ruh of GE Software; Huawei’s Safder Nazir; Micorosft’s Michael Mansour; Shafik Jiwani of Rolta; Hive technology’s Gert Botha; Rami Hajjar from Philips amongst many others. RTA’s Abdulla Al Madani delivered a session on the topic of smart and sustainable mobility that provided a holistic view on the initiatives adopted in driving a smart government. His inputs on RTA’s smart city strategy garnered a tremendous amount of interest and was followed by questions from many of the summit attendees.

Talking about the success of the summit, Brad Hariharan, Regional Director, Expotrade Middle East, mentioned, “In the second edition, our summit has covered a broad scope of topics and themes that are integral to smart city development in the Middle East. Experts from the government and industry leaders delivered keynote sessions with case studies and strategies of initiatives implemented that offered tremendous value to the summit attendees. We are thrilled with the feedback we have received from our sponsors and delegates. We look forward to continue our success at next year’s edition of the summit as well.”

Wim Elfrink, President, Digitalisation Solution Ventures moderated the first day’s panel discussion on cyber security, safe and secure connected cities. Joining him on the panel were Eric Eifert, Senior Vice President of Managed Security Services, DarkMatter; Furqan Ahmed Hashmi, IT Operations Leader, Emirates Investment Authority and Yousuf Mohammed Al Shaiba, Director of Smart Services Development Department, Ajman Municipality & Planning Department.

Day two of the summit commenced with Paul Copping of The Royal Borough of Greenwich’s session on what a smart city constitutes. Steven Velegrinis of Perkins + Will outlined how hydraulic systems will be used in future cities as a positive transformative urban element, while Faisal Rashid of Dubai Supreme Council of Energy spoke on mapping the energy intensity for Dubai and management of energy conservation.

Dr. Zahra Al Rawahi, Director of Innovation, The Research Council – Sultanate of Oman during her session spoke of how ICT is the main enabler of smart cities, and also shared examples of smart city solutions by some countries across the globe.

The second panel discussion of the summit was on the topic implementing sustainable strategies to increase energy efficiency in Dubai with a focus on solar energy. James Stewart, General Manger, Alec Energy moderated the panel and was accompanied by fellow panelists Dr. Corrado Sommariva, Managing Director, ILF Consulting Engineers; Jamie Low, Associate Engineer, Buro Happold Engineering; Matar Suhail Salem Al Mehairi, Vice President in Asset Management Department – Distribution Power Division, DEWA and Jane Boyle, Technical Director and Head of Sustainability and Energy, WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff.

With multiple networking sessions, attendees were presented with ample opportunities to visit the exhibitor lounge and connect with over 20 companies such as Samsung, Dark Matter, GE Lighting, Philips, Microsoft, Huawei, Rolta, Fusionex, Hive Technology and Introsys who showcased their smart city solutions. The success of the summit prompted sponsors and delegates to comment positively at the close. Salwar Bayaty, Assistant Director, Dubai Properties Group, said, “The topics and presentations were related to the theme of the summit and were extremely informative. There was a good mix and variety of presenters.” Mark Hauenstein, President, Technical Designs said, “An excellent forum to share ideas and technologies that promote and encourage smart infrastructure.”

The event closed with a prize draw that saw two lucky participants win a 2 nights’ stay at the luxurious Sofitel Dubai The Palm Resort & Spa and an Apple iPad.

2nd Annual Arab Future Cities Summit 2015 Kicks Off Tomorrow in Dubai

Keynote speech in progress at Arab Future Cities Summit Dubai 2014

Keynote speech in progress at Arab Future Cities Summit Dubai 2014

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, November 1, 2015: The stage is set for the 2nd Annual Arab Future Cities Summit 2015. Held under the patronage of Dubai Municipality and organized by global conference producers, Expotrade, the two-day summit will bring together over 350 attendees, including representatives of government organizations, sustainability experts and smart city solution providers.

Majed Al Suwaidi, Managing Director, Dubai Internet City and Dubai Outsource City will inaugurate the summit and deliver the opening speech in the presence of esteemed dignitaries such as Eng. Abdulla Rafia, Assistant Director General – Engineering & Planning Sector, Head of The Sustainability Committee, Dubai Municipality and ambassadors of the Embassies of Montenegro, Sweden, Islamic Republic of Iran, the Republic of Angola and Consul General of the Consulate General of Canada. It will be followed by a welcome address from Eng. Abdulla Rafia, Assistant Director General – Engineering & Planning Sector, Head of The Sustainability Committee, Dubai Municipality.

Mr. Brad Hariharan, Regional Director, Expotrade Middle East, said, “With an elite lineup of keynote speakers and panelists, our summit is the ideal platform to discuss technological innovations that deliver smart city solutions seamlessly and also hold dialogues on the region’s ambitions and progress to gain a smart city status.”

With a series of forward-looking topics, the summit agenda will feature engaging keynote sessions, case study presentations and interactive panel discussions. Across two days, the summit will provide an opportunity to gain insights from industry thought leaders and experts on the best practices, challenges and opportunities emerging in the smart city domain. The summit agenda will broadly cover topics under the purview of Big Data, Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, Connected Home, Cyber security and Connected Lighting.

Featuring presentations by 30 regional and internationally acclaimed speakers including, Abdulla Al Madani, CEO – Corporate Technical Support Services Sector, RTA; Stephen Turner, Head of Future Cities, Manchester City Council; Dr. Mario Rossi, Landscape Architecture Manager, The Office of H.H. The Crown Prince of Dubai; Faisal Rashid, Director, Demand Side Management, Dubai Supreme Council of Energy, to name a few, the summit will focus on the trends and technologies that will drive the growth of sustainable smart cities. Experts Yousuf Mohammed Al Shaiba, Director of Smart Services Development Department, Ajman Municipality & Planning Department and Furqan Ahmed Hashmi, IT Operations Leader, Emirates Investment Authority will participate in a panel discussion on Cyber Security, Safe and Secure Connected cities.

Offering unrivalled networking opportunities, possibility of dialogue and knowledge sharing with the industry stalwarts, the summit will showcase cutting-edge and emerging technologies that will shape the future of smart cities in the region. The summit has the support of more than 20 sponsors, including Samsung Business, Dark Matter, GE Lighting, Philips, Microsoft, Huawei, Rolta, Fusionex, Hive Technology and Introsys to name a few.

For more event details, please log on to http://smartcitiesdubai.com

Smart Data Summit 2016 Edition Dates Announced

Smart Data Summit 2016 edition dates announced

Smart Data Summit 2016 edition dates announced

  • The Summit will be held on 23-24 May 2016 at Sofitel The Palm Resort & Spa, Dubai
  • The underlying theme of the summit is future of data management and the role of smart data and analytics in driving revenue growth

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, October 27, 2015: Global conference producers, Expotrade today announced the 3rd Annual Smart Data Summit will be taking place on 23-24 May 2016 at Sofitel, The Palm Resort & Spa, Dubai. The summit is a leadership-level event, focused on exploring forward-thinking opportunities in the big data domain that will benefit over 300 participants from across the GCC.

The concept of Big Data and Analytics has evolved considerably with many companies effectively adopting it within their business practices. Businesses across sectors use the power of big data and analytics to assimilate information in order to imbibe and develop new solutions and optimize processes. The two day summit talks about how businesses can make profitable decisions using big data and analytics and increase their customer base.

Announcing the dates of the summit, Mr. Brad Hariharan, Regional Director, Expotrade Middle East, said, “We are thrilled to confirm the dates of the 2016 edition of our Smart Data Summit that will convene sector specialists and heads of leading regional and international companies across industries under one roof, deliberating on the challenges and opportunities arising from the field of Big Data and Analytics. According to a recent industry report, it is perceived that there is an increased interest from companies on the adoption of big data, analytics, mobility and cloud.”

The two-day conference agenda will encompass engaging and forward-looking topics such as making informed decisions to innovate and design products with big data; big data and analytics in telcos; smart data modernizing the utilities industry; BFSI sector’s gain from smart data and analytics to build loyal customer base and using data and intelligence for powering interoperability in smart cities. The summit offers two days of intensive learning experience filled with research-driven keynote sessions, case study presentations and panel discussions that will provide multiple perspectives on topics pertaining to Big Data and Analytics.

As in the previous editions of the summit, the attendees will include CIO’s and Heads of IT, Chief Technology Officers, CFO’s and Finance Directors, Heads of Data Analytics, Modeling and Mining, Heads of Marketing, System and Business Analysts, Data Architects and Scientists, Customer & Business Intelligence Specialists and Technology Specialists.

Last year’s edition of the summit saw a robust panel of speakers and experts from internationally renowned organizations such as Facebook, Twitter, du, IBM, Wipro, HP, Emirates NBD, and Flipkart, amongst many others take the stage to share insights on the theme of discovering the power of big data, influencing product decisions with analytics, data governance and security and using technology to improve customer experience.

The 2015 edition of the summit was a huge success, receiving adulation from attendees and speakers alike. Anupam Dikhit, Industry Manager, Twitter, said, “In terms of the way the event has been designed, the kind of speakers that presented, the entire structure and format – I think it’s fantastic. Because you have taken an issue or space that is up coming and a region that is up and coming – we have seen a lot of traction happen in the Middle East over the last few years, so it’s really a sunrise sector here – and you have got the best of thought-leaders from across the world. That’s not a mean feat.”

Dr. Dirk Jungnickel, Senior Vice President – Business Analytics, Emirates Integrated Telecommunications Company (du), said, “It has been a very pleasant and interesting event. I had some very good conversations during the breaks and also the presentations so far have been first-class. It’s a good mix of vendors and consumers of big data technologies or people who are applying the technologies.”

More information on the 3rd Annual Smart Data Summit is available now at http://www.smartdatadubai.com. Follow the Summit on social media with the hashtag #SDATAS2016.